The “That’s How We Rolled” memes

Meme’s are great aren’t they? So hilarious and yet sometimes these meme’s can do the opposite of entertain or Inform. They dismantle any form of knowledge that we hold to be fact. They can cling to one fact and as humans we tend to focus on one thing at a time.

When I was younger, on Saturday Night Live there was a skit done by Dana Carvey and he played this crotchety old man that they rightly called “Grumpy Old Man”.  He filled us all with laughter and quotes for days but it was a direct connection to what at the time was a percentage of our population.  He would say;

“Everything today is improved and I don’t like it. I hate it! In my day we didn’t have hair dryers. If you wanted to blow dry your hair you stood outside during a hurricane. Your hair was dry but you had a sharp piece of wood driven clear through your skull and that’s the way it was and you liked it! You loved it. Whoopee, I’m a human head-kabob. “

Now, we have the same people that most likely saw that during a younger version of themselves posting memes about stuff that was “better” back in the day.  Let me tell you what I think about these “That’s How We Rolled” memes.

 

 

 

 

 

They are near-sighted.  Slightly funny, but mostly ignorant.  “Not an I-phone in Sight, That’s how we rolled”.  I bet you a million dollars if those kids in that picture were teleported to 2017, an I-phone is what each one of them would be wanting.  In fact, going back to 1983 would suck after seeing 2017.  We like to think that the times we grew up in were the “golden age” of whatever we’re thinking of at the time but, the fact is that we all have very bad memories.   Short version.  It was boring in the house, so we went outside.  Until we started getting cooler things inside that made some kids want to stay there.  Some couldn’t afford these cool technologies or their parents found it to be unnecessary so they remained outdoor kids.  Some of us just did both.

“The 1980’s: No knee pads, helmets, brakes, or over-cautious soccer moms. That’s just how we rolled.”  Kids jumping off dirt mounds weren’t courageous and adventurous.  They were unsupervised kids that most likely could have broken some bones and worst case scenario killed themselves.  We shouldn’t celebrate absent Parenting.  We change.  We evolve. (some of us)  We tend to develop safer things based on what has happened in the past.  Bike manufacturers make more durable bikes nowadays because honestly its safer.  Cell Phones have GPS so, you can find your kid when “back in the day” they said they were at Sarah’s when in fact they are at their boyfriend’s house”.  The kids haven’t changed.  The bikes have been made safer.  The tech has been made smarter.  Just think about it, there are more X-Games now then there were in the 80’s.   100% more.

I believe that if someone has the perspective that “kids nowadays” aren’t adventurous, or courageous then they just aren’t paying attention.  Maybe they are just disappointed in their own kids’ choices and or non-action.  Or maybe their disappointed that kids aren’t getting mangled in Power wheels accidents because of the lack of parent supervision?  Who knows really.  Maybe they aren’t mad at all.  Maybe the posters and creators of these memes just like to stir up opinions from people like me.

It’s always good to reminisce about days of the past.  But leave them at that.  The past.  We’ve all developed into better people hopefully creating a safer environment for our children to grow up in.  If there is a hang up with children not “doing” what they should be, then you should look to the parents not the Year.

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